A Splash of Color in the Library

Clearview Library District Adult Programs, Events

people viewing painting

Arriving in the U.S. from Romania 25 years ago, Cornelia Davis was enthralled by the rich colors of America.

“Because I grew up in a communist country, everything was gray,” Davis explained. “When I came here, I was so fascinated by color.”

An interior designer by trade, Davis began creating her own work when her son was young  — her own work focuses on the upcycle movement — and began volunteering with the library’s art program in the early 2000s.

“I enjoy everything about art,” said Davis. “The library used to have an art show every year. When that stopped, they let me continue featuring artists.

“I want people to see that this is a creative town. It’s good for people to know we have artists in town — not many know that.”

Hanging Paintings

Exhibit curator Cornelia Davis (left) and March featured artist Kerry McGee (right) hang work in the Quiet Space.

The program showcases the work of different regional artists in the library’s Quiet Space area. Davis finds artists through a variety of ways, and features all mediums and levels, but gravitates towards those that are beginners and like to push the envelope.

“I look for artists constantly, and I work to build relationships with artists across Northern Colorado. I love artists who are willing to step out of their comfort zone. I like a little bit of excitement.”

paintings

The March exhibit features fiber art pieces from Fort Collins artist Kerry McGee, who started working with the medium in the last year and a half (see sidebar).

Each month, Davis thoughtfully curates the exhibit hand-in-hand with the artist. She believes the library is the perfect place for emerging artists.

“Through showing your work, you expose yourself as an artist and expose your work. I really want the artist to not be afraid. [The library] is a safe place to start,” she said.

While Davis is passionate about art, the true drive behind her volunteer efforts with the featured artist program is centered squarely with helping people.


“People have dreams. If I can help people reach that dream, I don’t need anything more in life.”


Kerry McGee

Artist Kerry McGee Displays Textile and Fiber Art

Inspired by Impressionist artists, Kerry McGee’s dreamy fiber art landscapes and folksy textile work grace the walls of the library’s Quiet Space this month.

“I have always been drawn to so many of the textile arts, but [fiber art is] something that has really kept my attention,” said McGee.

The majority of the pieces in the exhibit are crafted through both a wet and dry felting art process, an ancient practice dating back to the British Isles of 600 BC. McGee, who is self-taught, describes it as painting with fiber.

“I had no idea what I was doing, but started, in essence, ‘painting with fiber.’ I found myself seeing something and mentally creating it with fiber,” she shared. “Not knowing what I was doing allowed me to be more creative, with no limits as to any boundaries.”

All of McGee’s pieces are for sale. For inquiries, call 970-310-0476.